You are currently browsing the archives for January, 2011

Print Newspaper Delivery Cancelled Jan. 27

§ January 26th, 2011 § Filed under NIE News § No Comments

Attention NIE Teachers—Due to the snowstorm, print newspaper delivery will be canceled on Thursday, January 27, 2011 for all NIE schools.

You can still read the Boston Herald using the online Smart Edition. Click here to sign up today!

State of the Union Address: Common Core State Standards Activity

§ January 24th, 2011 § Filed under Current Events, English Language Arts, High School, History, Media criticism, Middle School § No Comments

Photo courtesy of whitehouse.gov

The President of the United States will deliver the State of the Union Address tomorrow evening. Have your students use articles in the Boston Herald to develop their own assessment of the state of the union.

Activity

After reading the newspaper, students can decide what specific issues the President should address in his speech. Students should also identify the greatest accomplishments of the current administration. Then have your class write a memo to the President to persuade him to discuss these topics. After the State of the Union Address, students can compare their memo to the speech that the President delivered.

Standard: Analyze in detail a series of events described in a text; determine whether earlier events caused later ones or simply preceded them.

This activity is adapted from the NIE and the Common Core State Standards packet. Download the complete packet available on the NIE homepage.

Designed for students in grades 7-12, this activity can complement English Language Arts, history, current events, and media criticism classes.

Climatologists for a Day: Explore why the Earth is getting warmer

§ January 19th, 2011 § Filed under Computers and Technology, Current Events, High School, Middle School, Science § No Comments

With mountain-sized snow banks on every street corner, it’s hard to imagine that the Earth is getting warmer. But according to an opinion article by Dale McFeatters in yesterday’s Boston Herald, the U.S. government says that our planet is heating up.

However, scientists don’t agree on why the temperature is rising. Have your students pretend they are climatologists for a day to help them examine the topic of climate change.

Activity
Read the Boston Herald article “Bottom line seems to be warmer Earth.” The article presents two reasons for temperature change:

1) Greenhouse gasses trap heat in the atmosphere.

2) The temperature increase is “part of a long-term cyclical variation.”

Vote with your feet
Have your students stand on different sides of the room to represent which reason they believe is causing warmer temperatures. Designate a different wall for greenhouse gasses, cyclical variation, and another reason not mentioned in the article.

After, have students break into groups to research the reason they chose. They can search the online Boston Herald Smart Edition, and use other internet resources to find information to back up their answer. Then ask students to vote with their feet again. Did anyone change their mind?

This activity is designed for students in grades 8-12. It can complement science, current events, and computer classes.

Please review the article prior to sharing it with your students, as the Boston Herald is written for all audiences.

If you need help finding the article for discussion, please contact Julie Burridge.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Classroom Activity

§ January 14th, 2011 § Filed under Current Events, English Language Arts, High School, History, Media criticism § No Comments

Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with your students using this “I Have A Dream” classroom activity from the NIE and the Common Core State Standards guide, available on the NIE homepage.

Background information
In 1963, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. organized a march on Washington to gain civil rights for all Americans. At this demonstration King delivered his famous “I Have A Dream” speech in which he advocated freedom for all.

Activity
Have your students look through the Boston Herald for the major issues of today. What issues concern Americans in 2011? Using that information, have your students discuss their dreams for a better world. Then they can write their own speech about their hopes and dreams.

Standard: Read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 9–12 text complexity band independently and proficiently.

This activity is designed for students in grades 9-12. It can complement English Language Arts, history, current events, and media criticism classes.

E-Edition Gets Smarter–Introducing the Smart Edition

§ January 12th, 2011 § Filed under NIE News § No Comments

The Boston Herald In Education E-Edition just got even smarter! We are excited to announce that the E-Edition is now called the Smart Edition. It’s still the same great resource, and your log on information will remain the same. But we hope you’ll agree that the online newspaper now has a more fitting name.

No Print Newspaper Delivery for Jan. 12, 2011

§ January 11th, 2011 § Filed under NIE News § No Comments

Attention NIE Teachers—We are canceling delivery of the  Boston Herald print edition for tomorrow, January 12, because of the snowstorm. However, you will still be able to access the E-Edition.

If you would like to sign up for the E-Edition, click here to fill out an order form.

Wrap Up 2010 and Ring in 2011 with Two Classroom Activities

§ January 3rd, 2011 § Filed under Current Events, English Language Arts, High School, History, Media criticism, Middle School § No Comments

2010 in Review

From the Gulf oil spill, to the trapped miners rescued in Chile, a lot has happened in 2010. And with the Boston Herald In Education program, students have been able to stay on top of the news.

Discuss with your students the top news stories from 2010. Students can search E-Edition archives for past stories, and read this Boston Herald article that lists important Massachusetts stories from 2010. Ask students what they thought the most important issues were and why. Were they all resolved? Then, have your students predict what they think will be important in 2011.

New Year’s Resolutions Writing Activity

Spend more time on homework. Help out more around the house. Eat less junk food. This time of year students are making New Year’s Resolutions—and they are trying to keep them.

Instead of making resolutions for themselves, have your students write a New Year’s Resolution for someone mentioned in today’s Boston Herald. Students can choose a politician, celebrity, athlete, or anyone else that is making headlines. Students will need to analyze the character of that person, and then decide if their chosen person needs to improve on something in 2011, or keep up the good work. After, students should come up with solutions to help that person stick to their resolution throughout the New Year.

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These activities are designed for students in grades 6-12. They can complement English Language Arts, history, current events, and media criticism classes.

Please review articles prior to sharing them with your students, as the Boston Herald is written for all audiences. If you need help finding a story mentioned in this post, please contact Julie Burridge.