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Celebrate Family Literacy Month with a week of newspaper activities

§ November 8th, 2013 § Filed under Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, NIE News, Teacher resources § No Comments

November is Family Literacy Month. Celebrate with a week of activities your family can enjoy with the newspaper!

Does your child have access to the Boston Herald Smart Edition? It is an exact copy of the print newspaper available online to local schools. Have their teacher order it here!

Monday

Check the Boston Herald’s business section, BizSmart, and find an article relating to technology.

Tuesday

Photo: www.bostonherald.com

Go to the sports section and read an article together about your family’s favorite local team.

Wednesday

Pick 5 words from the headlines and ask your child to think of a word that rhymes with each one.

Thursday

Create a game in which each family member gets a point for finding certain letters or words in the paper.

Friday

Photo: www.bostonherald.com

Go through the movie reviews and develop your family’s own rating system for movies viewed at home or in the theater.

Saturday

Search classifieds ads for a job your child might want to have someday.

Sunday

Help your child write a practice letter to the editor about a topic of interest.

For Family Literacy events and activities in your area, check MassLiteracy.org throughout the month!

 

A “Social Media Toolbox” for High School Journalists

§ November 28th, 2012 § Filed under Computers and Technology, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Teacher resources § No Comments

Image: Marina A. Hendricks

Are you a high school journalism teacher looking to incorporate social media into your students’ publications? Try this award winning program of activities and teacher guides, Social Media Toolbox, created by Marina Hendricks.

Students will learn about acceptable usage and policies, the ins and outs of Facebook and Twitter, and the ethical concerns of using social media in publications.

Each lesson plan is available as a PDF download with links to additional resources.

Brianne Costa

Boston Herald NIE Associate

Student Art Wanted for Publication: Deadline December 17

§ November 15th, 2012 § Filed under Art, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Middle School, NIE News § No Comments

The Boston Herald is calling for student art for its annual holiday section called “Eyes of a Child” which will appear in the newspaper on December 24. We gladly welcome drawings, poems, prose, and essays inspired by the holiday season. Only submissions sent via email by teachers or principals will be accepted. The deadline is December 17.

Please see the complete Eyes of a Child Guidelines for entry below:

1.  All entries must be sent via email by a teacher or principal. We are unable to accept submissions directly from students.

2.  Entries must be emailed to brianne.costa@bostonherald.com by December 17. Artwork should be scanned at its best resolution in PDF form.

3.  Written entries must not exceed 300 words. Editorial reserves the right to edit if necessary.

4.  In the email include the name, grade, school, city, teacher name and contact number for each student.

5.  Entries will be selected by the editorial department of the Boston Herald.

Teachers and principals–please email entries to

brianne.costa@bostonherald.com by December 17.

Student Art Wanted for Publication: Deadline Dec. 15

§ December 2nd, 2011 § Filed under Art, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Middle School, NIE News § No Comments

The Boston Herald is calling for student art for its annual holiday section called “Eyes of a Child” which will appear in the newspaper on December 24. We gladly welcome drawings, poems, prose, and essays inspired by the holiday season.

Only submissions sent via email by teachers or principals will be accepted. We are unable to accept submissions directly from students.

Eyes of a Child Guidelines for Entry:

  1. All entries must be sent via email by a teacher or principal. We are unable to accept submissions directly from students.
  2. Entries must be emailed to julie.burridge@bostonherald.com by December 15. Scanned artwork should be at its best resolution.
  3. Written entries must not exceed 300 words. Editorial reserves the right to edit if necessary.
  4. In your email include the name, grade, school, city, teacher name and contact number for each student.
  5. Entries will be selected by the editorial department of the Boston Herald.

Teachers and principals–please email entries to
julie.burridge@bostonherald.com by December 15.

Discussing bin Laden’s Death with Students

§ May 2nd, 2011 § Filed under Current Events, English Language Arts, High School, History, Media criticism, Middle School § No Comments

The death of Osama bin Laden late yesterday marks an important day in our history. Even if your students are too young to remember where they were on the morning of September 11, 2001, they’ll surely have questions about bin Laden’s death and how it will affect our future. Today’s Boston Herald can help you facilitate those discussions with your students.

Today’s Herald contains articles on many different aspects of bin Laden’s death, including:

Over the next few days you’ll find even more articles that you may want to share with your classes.

Please review all articles prior to sharing with students as the Boston Herald is written for all audiences.

TV and Teen Drinking

§ April 28th, 2011 § Filed under Current Events, English Language Arts, Health, High School, Media criticism § Tagged , , § No Comments

Between prom and graduation, it’s the season to celebrate. The end of the school year is also an important time to talk to students about celebrating responsibly. Here is an NIE activity that can open a discussion about the dangers of underage drinking.

Background
Researchers have found that the more television high school students watch, the more likely they are to start drinking. The characters on TV who drink alcohol are often portrayed as influential and glamorous to teens. Take the MTV show Skins for example. The first time I saw a commercial for the program I thought it was a public service announcement against underage drinking. But it’s the opposite—Skins is centered on teenagers partying and consuming alcohol.

Activity
Have your students review the television listings in the Boston Herald. Based on research and prior knowledge of the shows, students should make a list of programs that can encourage drinking. Then discuss with your class why those programs might promote drinking, and how underage drinking is harmful.

Standard
Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.

This activity is adapted from the NIE and the Common Core State Standards packet. Download the complete packet available on the NIE homepage.

Designed for students in grades 9-12, this activity can complement English Language Arts, current events, media criticism, and health classes.

Nifty Newspaper Recycling Projects

§ April 22nd, 2011 § Filed under Art, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Math, Middle School, Science § No Comments

Newspaper Slippers courtesty of Craftbits.com

Courtesy of craftbits.com

In celebration of Earth Day, here are some fun ways to reuse old newspapers before they make it into the recycling bin.

Create Newspaper Slippers
Learn how to make one-time-use slippers that double as a great art project.

Write Newspaper Poetry
Have your students look through the newspaper for words and phrases that catch their eye. Students should cut them out and arrange them to form a poem. Then students can paste their newspaper poem on a new sheet of paper.

Courtesy of Newspaperbagproject.com

Craft Newspaper Lunch or Gift Bags
Tired of bringing lunch to school in a brown paper bag? Make your own lunch bag—or gift bag—out of old newspapers.

Build Newspaper Towers
How tall a tower can your students build using only two sheets of newspaper?

Need even more recycling inspiration?
Check out this house in Rockport that’s made entirely out of newspapers!

A Smart Way to Go Green
Another great way to reduce your carbon footprint is to read the online Boston Herald Smart Edition. It’s an exact replica of the Boston Herald print edition, but it never needs to be recycled. Teachers can order a free subscription here.

Student Jobs: McDonald’s to hire 2,200 employees

§ April 19th, 2011 § Filed under Current Events, English Language Arts, High School, Marketing, Media criticism § No Comments

Photo courtesy of Bostonherald.com

Ask someone about their first job, and there’s a good chance they worked at McDonald’s. Everyone from my high school friends to my mother started out by serving up fries. Today McDonald’s will pass down the golden arches to more young people as they hire 2,200 employees in Massachusetts during their National Hiring Day.

But teens have stiff competition. According to today’s Boston Herald, the rough economy means that more experienced workers are expected to apply for the same jobs as students.

Perhaps some of your students will take a day out of their April vacation to apply for a job at McDonald’s. When school resumes, it would be a great time to talk about employment. Read the Boston Herald article Workers of all ages vie for McJobs. Then discuss student jobs with your class.

Discussion Questions:

  • Who has a job?
  • What do you do for work?
  • Do you work with mainly older people, younger people, or do you work with a varied age range?
  • How many of you work at McDonald’s or another fast food restaurant?
  • Did anyone apply for a job at McDonald’s during National Hiring Day? Did you get hired?
  • Is anyone having trouble getting hired?
  • Has anyone been laid off?
  • How has your experience looking for a first job been different than that of your parents or older siblings? Why?
  • What are some things you can do to enhance your chances of getting hired when you apply for a job?

This activity is designed for students in grades 9-12. It can complement English Language Arts, media criticism, marketing, and current events classes.

Please review the article prior to sharing it with your students, as the Boston Herald is written for all audiences.

Contact Julie Burridge if you need help finding the article for discussion.

Announcing our Flip Camera Contest Winner!

§ April 15th, 2011 § Filed under Computers and Technology, Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, History, Media criticism, Middle School, NIE News § No Comments

Congratulations to fourth grade teacher Casey Deaguero from Bernazzani Elementary School! She was chosen as our Flip Camera contest winner.

Casey uses a scavenger hunt to engage students in reading the Boston Herald Smart Edition. Her activity is designed for students in grades 3-5, but it can be modified for different grade levels. Try it out with your students the next time you read the online newspaper.

Newspaper Hunt

  1. What is the month, day and year of the newspaper you are investigating?
  2. Is there an advertisement on the front cover of the newspaper for something to buy or a show to see?  If so, what is the name of the company who has an ad and what are they trying to promote or sell?
  3. Locate the blue table of contents button at the top of the screen.  What page can the “scoreboard” section be found?  How about the “news” section?
  4. Under the table of contents click on the “picture gallery.”Find a picture that looks interesting.  Then click on it and read the article.  What was it about?
  5. How would you describe today’s weather? What is the high temperature? What is the low temperature? Hint: To find the weather section, click on page two of the newspaper and look for the table of contents printed on the left side of that page.
  6. Below the weather is the TV guide.  What is the name of a show you would like to watch? What channel and time is it on?To the right of the weather is information about tides.  In Boston what time is the morning high tide? How high will it be?
  7. Browse through the newspaper until you find a page showing cars for sale.  If you could buy any car what kind would you buy?  How much does it cost? What color would you pick? Bonus Question: If the total cost of your car was paid over a 12 month period, how much would you pay each month?
  8. Find the comics section.  Read any comic strip of your choice.  Can you figure out what it is about?
  9. Browse through the newspaper until you find a page showing houses for sale.  Which house would you like to buy? What town is it in? How much does it cost?
  10. Find an ad for an item in the newspaper under $500.  How much does it cost? How much would it cost if you bought 4 of them?
  11. Look at the classified/jobs section of the newspaper.  Which one sounds interesting to you? Why? What kind of education or training do you think you would need in order to work this job?

Radiation in Mass. Water: Discussing nuclear power safety

§ March 28th, 2011 § Filed under Current Events, English Language Arts, High School, Media criticism, Science § No Comments

More than two weeks after Japan’s natural disaster that triggered a near nuclear disaster, radioactive rainwater has been discovered in Massachusetts. But according to today’s Boston Herald article “Radioactive Rain in Mass.,” the level of radiation found in Massachusetts water is low and cannot harm humans.

Activity
Read the Boston Herald story “Radioactive Rain in Mass.” by O’Ryan Johnson. Then discuss the article with your class, as well as the safety of nuclear power plants in our country.

For additional information about nuclear power, including a list of nuclear power plants in the United States, visit the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s website.

Key Discussion Questions

  • Do you feel comfortable drinking tap water? Will you continue to use it after today’s findings?
  • Do you think people will rush to stock up on bottled water even though only low levels of radiation were found in Massachusetts?
  • Why do you think experts are not releasing the city where they found the radioactive water?
  • Did you expect the nuclear situation in Japan to affect Massachusetts?
  • After the disaster in Japan, some people are questioning the safety of nuclear power plants in the United States. Do you think we should review the safety of our nuclear power plants and determine if we need additional protection against natural disasters?
  • Do you think we should use nuclear power? If not, what other source of energy should we use?

This activity is designed for students in grades 9-12. It can complement science, English Language Arts, media criticism, and current events classes.

Please review the article prior to sharing it with your students, as the Boston Herald is written for all audiences.

Contact Julie Burridge if you need help finding the article for discussion.

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