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Student Voices November Prompt

§ November 7th, 2014 § Filed under Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Media criticism, Middle School, NIE News, Student Voices, Teacher resources § No Comments

Student Voices gives students a unique opportunity in publishing and journalism. See this month’s prompt, as well as the Student Voices rules, below.

Note: You must be subscribed to the Boston Herald in Education program to participate in Student Voices. Don’t have the Boston Herald in your classroom yet? Order here.

Read the article “Patrick: Mass in ‘better place’ than 8 years ago” on page 24 of the November 5 Boston Herald, then answer the following prompt.

After the results of the 2014 midterm elections, Governor Deval Patrick stated that he believes Massachusetts is a better place now than it was 8 years ago, but that there is still more work to be done. Do you agree with Patrick’s statement? Why or why not? Do you have faith in Governor-Elect Charlie Baker? What changes do you think we need to make forMassachusettsto become a better place to live? 

Email responses to Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com by Wednesday, November 26. Note: Responses must be emailed by a teacher. Responses emailed directly from students will not be accepted. 

You may include a photo of each writer with a copy of our media release form signed by a parent or guardian.

Students’ responses will be published right here on the NIE Blog, and one student per month will be published in the print Boston Herald newspaper!

Any questions? Contact Brianne at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6220.

Student Voices October Prompt

§ October 9th, 2014 § Filed under Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Middle School, NIE News, Student Voices § No Comments

Student Voices gives students a unique opportunity in publishing and journalism. See this month’s prompt, as well as the Student Voices rules, below.

Note: You must be subscribed to the Boston Herald Smart Edition to participate in Student Voices. Don’t have the Smart Edition yet? Order here.

Read the article “MIT Media Lab gets $10M to major in social studies,” on page 2 of the October 2 Boston Herald, then answer the following prompt.

Researchers at Massachusetts Institute of Technology were recently given 10 million dollars to study Twitter in an attempt to find patterns that could tell us more about people and how they interact. What can studying social media help us understand about our culture and society? What forms of social media do you use? What do you get out of it?

Email responses to Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com by Thursday, October 30. Note: Responses must be emailed by a teacher. Responses emailed directly from students will not be accepted.

Please include a photo of each writer with a copy of our media release form signed by a parent or guardian.

Students’ answers will be posted right here on the NIE blog, and one student per month will be published in the print Boston Herald newspaper!

Any questions? Please contact Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6220.

Student Voices 2014-2015 Information

§ August 19th, 2014 § Filed under Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Middle School, NIE News, Student Voices, Teacher resources § No Comments

Attention NIE Teachers,

Your students have an exciting opportunity to have their work published in the print Boston Herald newspaper every month with the “Student Voices” program. We’re looking for submissions from budding journalists each month of the school year.

Here’s how it works:

  • During the first week of the month: Check the NIE blog for writing prompts based on Boston Herald articles. Give your students a chance to read, think, and respond to the questions with their own valuable opinions in up to 300 words.
  • Email us your students’ responses and a photo, along with a signed media release form from a parent or guardian, by the deadline posted with the prompt (Submissions must be sent in by a teacher who is subscribed to the free Boston Herald Smart Edition. Submissions sent by students will not be considered. ) Some of the best answers will be displayed on the NIE blog.
  • One student response will be published in the print edition of the Boston Herald every month!

Questions? Please email brianne.costa@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6220.

 

Student Voices responses: Young people in politics

§ May 27th, 2014 § Filed under Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Media criticism, Middle School, NIE News, Student Voices § No Comments

Check out what some local students had to say in response to page 19 of the April 3 Boston Herald Smart Edition article “A high school senior, and selectman, too” and the prompt below:

Patrick Reynolds just turned 18 and is still a senior in high school, and he was just voted town selectmen of North Attleboro. Reynolds raised his own campaign money, went door to door, and asked his friends and their parents to vote for him, winning the town’s 4-way election. What are some of the benefits of having a young person in a position of leadership in politics? How can young people become more interested and involved in politics?

“The newly elected town selectman of North Attleboro, Patrick Reynolds, is 18 and still in high school. Having a young person like Reynolds in office can greatly benefit politics. For starters, I think it helps more young people understand politics when they see someone their own age in a leadership position. It also gives us hope that even though we are young, our ideas are still heard and respected. Speaking as a college student, I sometimes find politics to be centered on keeping policies the same as they always have been as opposed to understanding that we need to change and adjust with the times. For instance, political discussion in school has lately revolved around the first African American President or the possibility of the first woman President. While I do agree that some policies and laws should remain the same, in today’s world times are changing and politicians like Patrick Reynolds will only help more individuals come to terms with that. In my opinion, young people really do want to understand politics and be involved in change. I strongly agree that 18 year old Patrick Reynolds will greatly serve his town of North Attleboro. Although he may be the first selectman to not have a high school degree, his victory is well deserved. He had to raise his own campaign money and canvas door to door, all while worrying about exams and keeping a social life. I can only hope that Reynolds’ new position will help more young people come to understand politics and become interesting in contributing to change. This will help our future generations adapt to change much easier and not be afraid to speak up and get involved.”

-Lindsay Costa, Salem State University

Thank you to all of the teachers and students who participated.

May will be the last round of Student Voices for the school year. Check out the prompt about regulations on e-Cigarettes here and submit to brianne.costa@bostonherald.com by Friday, May 30.

Student Voices Writing Prompt #5

§ May 9th, 2014 § Filed under Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Middle School, Student Voices § No Comments

May will be our last round of the Student Voices writing contest for the school year, so please don’t hesitate to participate! It’s a great opportunity for students, and it’s easy!

First, have students read the article “Boston official: curb use of e-cigs” here or on page 10 of the May 1 Smart Edition.

Then, give them the following prompt to answer in 300 words or less:

Boston’s Chief of Public Health recently went before the FDA in Washington, DC to push for stronger regulations on electronic cigarettes. Makers of e-Cigarettes claim that their products help people quit smoking, but this has not been scientifically proven. Lawmakers also worry that the packaging and labeling of e-Cigarettesappeal to children and teens and that they may be a gateway to smoking for minors. Do you think there should be tougher regulations on e-Cigarettes? Explain why or why not.

Email responses to Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com by Friday, May 30.

Please include a photo of each writer with a copy of this media release form signed by a parent or guardian.

Students’ responses will be posted on the NIE blog. One student will be published in the print Boston Herald newspaper in early June.

Any questions? Please contact Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6220.

Student Voices responses: Reducing energy waste in MA

§ April 15th, 2014 § Filed under Computers and Technology, Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Middle School, Science, Student Voices § No Comments

Check out what some local students had to say in response to page 18 of the March 4 Boston Herald Smart Edition article “State may not meet ‘green’ mandate” and the prompt below:
Massachusetts may not meet the country’s goals for greenhouse gas emissions set for 2020 unless serious action is taken. We are predicted to reduce the harmful contributor to global warming by 20 percent instead of the legally required 25. Recommendations include reducing methane leaks from natural pipelines and helping energy and gas utilities meet their energy saving goals. Why is it important for Massachusetts to reduce their energy waste? What can we all do on a smaller scale to “go green” and help our state?

 

 

 

 

 

 

“It is important for Massachusetts to reduce its energy waste because No. 1, it will help save money in the state budget and No. 2, it’s the governor’s responsibility to do that.

As our governor, Deval Patrick needs to reduce expenses in Massachusetts. There are many ways to reduce this waste and to save money in the state budget. State-owned buildings can model what we do in our classroom at Dexter Park Elementary School. We monitor our light use to help stop wasting electricity.

State buildings can open up as many shades as possible because sunlight is free and electricity costs money. Another way shades help to cut down waste is to keep shades closed on cold days to keep heat in. Another idea to reduce waste is to shut building doors to keep heat in or out of individual rooms. Also, in the hot months, use the shades to keep heat out and cooler air in. This cuts down on air conditioner and electricity use.

Above all else, when electronics are not in use, shut them off to cut down on energy waste!

On a small scale, to help our state to “go green” we can recycle old tires that people just throw away so the state can use them to make rubber pipes to replace leaking metal gas pipes. Rubber pipes won’t wear out as easy as the metal ones. This is extraordinary for two reasons. It cleans up our environment, helping us “go green,” and will eventually prevent gas leaks.

We can run tire drives like can drives to collect tires from people who need to dispose of them or just donate them. Other ways we can help our state is to recycle everything possible that is recyclable, which will clean our roads, towns and the state of Massachusetts.

Another idea is to start a campaign to educate kids like us on ways they can help to “go green.” We can create posters and send them to all Massachusetts schools. We will call it The D.P. (Dexter Park’s and Deval Patrick’s) Energy Waste Agents! Let’s spread the word!

According to a Boston Herald article, Massachusetts has been ranked No. 1 for saving energy for the last three years, and if we want to stay on top we need to step up our game, recycle and cut down on our waste.”

-Stephen Gaj, Kritika Khati and Gavin Sullivan

Dexter Park Elementary School

Thank you to all the teachers and students who participated. Check out our next Student Voices writing prompt about young people in politics here.

Student Voices Writing Prompt #4

§ April 3rd, 2014 § Filed under Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Media criticism, Middle School, NIE News, Student Voices, Teacher resources § No Comments

Thank you to the teachers who have participated in Student Voices, a new program that gives students the chance to have their opinions on current events published in the print Boston Herald. Read some of the latest student submissions here.
Teachers must be subscribed to the Boston Herald Smart Edition to participate in Student Voices. Don’t have the Smart Edition yet? Order here!
Here is the next writing prompt:
Read the article “A high school senior, and selectman, too” on page 19 of the April 3 Boston Herald Smart Edition. You can also read the article at this link. Then, answer the following writing prompt:

Patrick Reynolds just turned 18 and is still a senior in high school, and he was just voted town selectmen of North Attleboro. Reynolds raised his own campaign money, went door to door, and asked his friends and their parents to vote for him, winning the town’s 4-way election. What are some of the benefits of having a young person in a position of leadership in politics? How can young people become more interested and involved in politics?

Use the Calendar tool in the Smart Edition to access past issues. Instructions on using the Calendar tool are found here.
Deadline: Thursday, May 1

Please email your responses with an individual photo of each student to Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com.

*If you send photos you must have a signed media release form from a parent or guardian. Download the Media Release Form here.

If you have any questions about how to participate, contact Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6220.

 

Student Voices Writing Prompt #3

§ March 4th, 2014 § Filed under Computers and Technology, Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Media criticism, Middle School, NIE News, Science, Student Voices, Teacher resources § No Comments

Thank you to the teachers who have participated in Student Voices, a new program that gives students the chance to have their opinions on current events published in the print Boston Herald. Read some of the latest student submissions here.

Teachers must be subscribed to the Boston Herald Smart Edition to participate in Student Voices. Don’t have the Smart Edition yet? Order here!

 

Here is the next writing prompt:

Read the article “State may not meet ‘green’ mandate” on page 18 of the March 4 Boston Herald Smart Edition, then answer the following writing prompt.

Massachusetts may not meet the country’s goals for greenhouse gas emissions set for 2020 unless serious action is taken. We are predicted to reduce the harmful contributor to global warming by 20 percent instead of the legally required 25. Recommendations include reducing methane leaks from natural pipelines and helping energy and gas utilities meet their energy saving goals. Why is it important for Massachusetts to reduce their energy waste? What can we all do on a smaller scale to “go green” and help our state?

Use the Calendar tool in the Smart Edition to access past issues. Instructions on using the Calendar tool are found here.

Deadline: Thursday, March 27

Please email your responses with an individual photo of each student to Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com.

*If you send photos you must have a signed media release form from a parent or guardian. Download the Media Release form here.

If you have any questions about how to participate, contact Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6220.

 

Newspapers in Education Week is March 3-7

§ March 3rd, 2014 § Filed under Computers and Technology, Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Media criticism, Middle School, NIE News, Teacher resources § No Comments

Newspapers in Education week begins today!

This downloadable NIE Instructional Calendar provides a subject-specific newspaper activity for each day of the school year. Here are this week’s activities to try with your class:

Monday: Language Arts

Rank each item on the front page in order of importance. Why did the news stories get the placement that they did?

Tuesday: Social Studies

In news articles, identify cultural differences between foreign countries and ours. Make a categorized list of cultural differences by country.

Wednesday: Math

Have students read a story and discuss the importance of numbers to the story. Have them rewrite the story without numbers. Can they still tell the same story?

Thursday: Science

List major science-related problems facing today’s society. Assuming it is 100 years from now, write about how the problems were solved.

Friday: Critical Thinking

Look at a feature article closely to see what words and sentences help to make you have certain feelings about the article. Make a list of these words and sentences.

NIE Week is a great time to help keep our program going. Make a donation today at Fundraise.com/BostonHerald and you can help give free access to newspapers and education tools to students, as well as fund our Student Voices publishing opportunities, teacher technology workshops, media tours of the Boston Herald, and more.

Donate today at Fundraise.com/BostonHerald

 

Student Voices Writing Prompt #2

§ February 11th, 2014 § Filed under Computers and Technology, Current Events, Elementary School, English Language Arts, High School, Journalism, Media criticism, Middle School, NIE News, Student Voices § No Comments

Thank you to the teachers who participated in Student Voices, a new program that gives students the chance to have their opinions on current events published in the print Boston Herald. Read some of the awesome student submissions here.

Teachers must be subscribed to the Boston Herald Smart Edition to participate in Student Voices. Don’t have the Smart Edition yet? Order here!

Here is the next writing prompt:

from Boston Herald article by Scott Lauber

Check out page 42 of the February 11 Boston Herald Smart Edition for a two page Red Sox spread with photos and statistics, and answer the following question:

After winning the World Series in 2013, the Red Sox will report to Spring Training in Fort Myers, Florida later this week. The team will play their Opening Day game against the Baltimore Orioles at Fenway Park on March 31. What are your predictions for the Red Sox for the 2014 season? Which players do you think will be this year’s stars based on their statistics?

Use the Calendar tool in the Smart Edition to access past issues. Instructions on using the Calendar tool are found here.

Deadline: Thursday, February 27.

Please email your responses with an individual photo of each student to Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com.

*If you send photos you must have a signed media release form from a parent or guardian. Download the Media Release form here.

If you have any questions about how to participate, contact Brianne Costa at brianne.costa@bostonherald.com or call 617-619-6220.

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