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April is Financial Literacy Month

§ April 8th, 2014 § Filed under Elementary School, High School, Marketing, Media criticism, Middle School, Teacher resources § No Comments

It’s never too early to start teaching young people to have good money saving habits, and what better time to start? April is Financial Literacy Month, and our curriculum page has an entire section dedicated to Financial Education, including a colorful and interesting activity guide, “Be Money Smart,” which introduces students to the idea of investing, saving, and managing their money. You can find the guide on our curriculum page, here.

Note: You must be subscribed to the Boston Herald Smart Edition for access to our curriculum page. Don’t have the Smart Edition yet? Order here.

Try these finance themed activities and discussions with the Boston Herald Smart Edition:

  • Become familiar with the daily BizSmart section of the Boston Herald. List some of the topics covered over a period of days. Did any of the topics affect or interest you? Were they mostly local, state, or national stories?
  • Practice making wise money choices by going “shopping” through the Smart Edition. Compare prices on the following items and list the range of prices found: milk, sporting goods, sneakers, televisions, and pizza.
  • Become familiar with the Smart Edition’s stock market pages. Then find a news story about something you think might affect a specific company’s stock.
  • Find at least two newspaper advertisements for the same product. Compare the ads and determine the best buy based on the information provided. Discuss how the advertisers are competing for your business and which approach is the most effective.

Students invest time with state treasurer

§ March 7th, 2013 § Filed under Computers and Technology, Current Events, High School, Marketing, Math, NIE News § No Comments

 

Students taking part in the Herald’s StoxSmart competition had a chance to meet with State Treasurer Steven Grossman earlier this week. They chatted over ice cream about the unpredictability of the stock market and trusting your instincts.

The students, who have the chance to change their portfolios this week, gained valuable insight in investments, finances, and making decisions that will surely help them in the competition.

Read the full article here.

Student Jobs: McDonald’s to hire 2,200 employees

§ April 19th, 2011 § Filed under Current Events, English Language Arts, High School, Marketing, Media criticism § No Comments

Photo courtesy of Bostonherald.com

Ask someone about their first job, and there’s a good chance they worked at McDonald’s. Everyone from my high school friends to my mother started out by serving up fries. Today McDonald’s will pass down the golden arches to more young people as they hire 2,200 employees in Massachusetts during their National Hiring Day.

But teens have stiff competition. According to today’s Boston Herald, the rough economy means that more experienced workers are expected to apply for the same jobs as students.

Perhaps some of your students will take a day out of their April vacation to apply for a job at McDonald’s. When school resumes, it would be a great time to talk about employment. Read the Boston Herald article Workers of all ages vie for McJobs. Then discuss student jobs with your class.

Discussion Questions:

  • Who has a job?
  • What do you do for work?
  • Do you work with mainly older people, younger people, or do you work with a varied age range?
  • How many of you work at McDonald’s or another fast food restaurant?
  • Did anyone apply for a job at McDonald’s during National Hiring Day? Did you get hired?
  • Is anyone having trouble getting hired?
  • Has anyone been laid off?
  • How has your experience looking for a first job been different than that of your parents or older siblings? Why?
  • What are some things you can do to enhance your chances of getting hired when you apply for a job?

This activity is designed for students in grades 9-12. It can complement English Language Arts, media criticism, marketing, and current events classes.

Please review the article prior to sharing it with your students, as the Boston Herald is written for all audiences.

Contact Julie Burridge if you need help finding the article for discussion.

Examining Fads

§ February 17th, 2011 § Filed under Current Events, English Language Arts, High School, History, Marketing, Middle School § No Comments

Photo courtesy of sillybandz.com

My students were so crazy about Silly Bandz last year that some of them were covered up to their elbows in bracelets. Just a year later the once-coveted Silly Bandz are out; I’ve barley seen any students wearing them.

Silly Bandz are an example of fads—something we love today, but will be out of favor tomorrow. Students can examine fads, what makes them popular, and how long they might stay in the spotlight with this NIE activity.

Activity
Brainstorm a list of current fads with your class, and then have students find evidence of fads in the Boston Herald. Students can look for fads in the fields of fashion, food, entertainment or even sports. Have your class predict how long each one will last, and discuss why they are popular. Don’t forget to mention fads that were popular when you were in school!

Standard: Acquire and use accurately grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases

Tip Read back issues of the Boston Herald to find even more examples of fads by using the online Smart Edition. Sign up for the Smart Edition here.

This activity is adapted from the NIE and the Common Core State Standards packet, available on the NIE homepage.

This activity is designed for students in grades 6-12. It can complement English Language Arts, current events, media criticism, marketing, and history classes.

Current Event for Discussion: Web sites track users

§ December 8th, 2010 § Filed under Computers and Technology, Current Events, English Language Arts, High School, Marketing, Media criticism, Middle School, Science § No Comments

Whether you’re keeping tabs on the Patriots, or shopping online, it’s impossible for Web sites to track other sites you’ve visited—Right?

Wrong.

The Boston Herald recently reported that some Web sites have been secretly “history sniffing,” or tracking the browsing history of internet users. This information is especially valuable to con artists and online companies alike.

Have your students read the article “A browser flaw lets Web sites track you.” Then discuss it with your class.

Key Discussion Points:

  • If a Web site tracks your history, should they be required to notify you?
  • If you knew a Web site was tracking your history, would you use it?
  • Do you have a right to keep your online browsing history private?
  • Should Web sites be permitted to “history sniff?” Why or why not?
  • What could your browsing history be used for?
  • Would you allow history sniffing on your computer if it meant that you could get better prices for products you buy online?

This activity is designed for students in grades 8-12. It can complement science, English Language Arts, current events, marketing, media criticism, and computer classes.

Please review the article prior to sharing it with your students, as the Boston Herald is written for all audiences.

If you need help finding the article for discussion, please contact Julie Burridge.